South Shields Daily Photo

A collection of images from South Shields and the North of England

Archive for the ‘History’ Category

St. Hilda’s Memorial

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St. Hilda's Memorial, South Shields

Colliery wheel

This is the memorial wheel erected to commemorate the deaths of the 51 men and boys who were killed in an explosion at the St. Hilda’s Colliery in South Shields on 28th. June 1839. It has recently been cleaned up and given a new home just yards from the mine shaft where the disaster occurred, after the building of a new supermarket in the town.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28mm lens, 1/1000 second, f8, iso 200

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Written by curly

August 26, 2009 at 12:01 am

The Parish Church

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St. Hildas Church, South Shields

The Church of St. Hilda

St. Hilda’s Church in South Shields Market Place is a familiar landmark to locals and to visitors. There has been a church stood there continually since 647 AD and the present church is the Parish Church of South Shields.

This is the view of the nave and the rather ornate altar and apse.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28mm lens, 1/8 second, f5.6, iso 800

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Written by curly

August 21, 2009 at 12:06 am

Dressed for digging?

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Arbeia Roman fort, South Shields

Arbeia Roman Fort, South Shields

The Roman Fort in South Shields was first excavated in Victorian times in the 1870s. Yesterday local children had the chance to experience how the Victorians found Roman and Iron Age artefacts on the site by taking part in a dig of their own.

These elegant ladies (from Hartlepool) were on hand to let visitors know how how things were done over a hundred years ago, I pictured them in the reconstructed Commandant’s quarters before seeking out the site of the “dig”. I did wonder whether they dressed like this when on their hands and knees in six inches of mud and earth with a trowel in their finely gloved hands!

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 30mm lens, 1/45 second, f5.6, iso 800

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Written by curly

August 2, 2009 at 12:01 am

Reflected history

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Ocean Road, South Shields

Ocean Road (through the gold window)

An odd quirky shot with odd colours. This is Ocean Road in South Shields as seen in a reflection of the gold mirrored windows of “The Beach”, a popular town centre bar. Oh, and it was raining.

From the left, a mainly empty shop which used to house a supermarket (now relocated to Coronation Street)), the statue of South Shields born John/James Simpson Kirkpatrick (the man with the donkey), Kirkpatrick’s public house (formerly the Marine School)

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28 mm lens, 1/15 second, f8, iso 200

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Written by curly

July 31, 2009 at 12:01 am

The Russian Convoy Club

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veterans of the Russian convoys in South Shields

Armed Forces Day

These are the real guys in the white hats, they were men who served at sea in the Russian Convoys between 1941 and 1945 helping the supply of materials exchanged between the Allied forces of the west and Russia in the Second World War. Their losses were heavy and more men from South Shields lost their lives at sea during the second great war than from any other town in the UK. They made regular journeys from UK and foreign ports via Scapa Flow to Murmansk and Archangel to keep Russia supplied with vital materials to continue her war effort, but their losses were heavy and arduous, 2800 lives were lost in the 78 convoys and over 100 ships ended their voyages at the bottom of the oceans as victims of German U-boats and surface ships.

The Russian Convoy Club have taken to wearing a white beret with badge to signify their participation in the vital logistics operation that sustained the Allied efforts.

On the left is Bob Robertson and his wife, and on the right George Nicols and his wife: I was honoured to meet them as they convened for a special service to mark Armed Forces Day on the steps of South Shields Town Hall yesterday, men such as these inspire the pride and remembrance in both our armed forces and the merchant fleet which protected our threatened democracy during those dark days. We should never forget the impact of their lives’ work and the lessons of history which flow from it.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 46 mm lens, 1/350 second, f4, iso 200

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Written by curly

June 29, 2009 at 12:39 am

Posted in Colour, History, People, South Shields

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Ship’s chandler

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138 High Street west, Sunderland

138 High Street West, Sunderland

Used to be a ship’s chandler in the days when they had wooden hulls and sails, now it’s a pub.

The area around the bottom end of High Street in Sunderland would have been very bustling and busy about a hundred years ago when it was the centre of a busy commercial port, now it looks a bit run down, although a fair amount of new business and apartments are growing there.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 82 mm lens, 1/750 second, f5.6, iso 200

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Written by curly

June 28, 2009 at 12:01 am

Converging lines

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South Shields pier

South Shields pier

Yes they look like tram lines but I don’t think trams ever ran here. This is the south pier, a mile long from the pier head to the wooden doll, (which used to be stuck in the cement of the lighthouse at the end), on the right is the headquarters of the South Shields Volunteer Life Brigade. The foundation stones for the pier were laid in 1854 and at that time these lines were also laid for a steam powered crane to carry the gigantic boulders that were dropped into the sea to form the base of the pier , the crane was only destroyed in recent decades! The north and south piers were not completed until 41 years later in 1895.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28 mm lens, 1/750 second, f8, iso 200

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Written by curly

June 25, 2009 at 12:01 am