South Shields Daily Photo

A collection of images from South Shields and the North of England

Newcastle

with 2 comments

Castle keep, Newcastle

Castle keep

Thirteen miles along the road from South Shields is the region’s capital Newcastle upon Tyne, a city which is steeped in history, sitting in a landscape which  was inhabited by monks and scholars such as the Venerable Bede, and Saints Aidan and Cuthbert. Our lands were colonised by Roman armies and ravaged by Viking raiders before England succumbed to the army of William, the Duke of Normandy in 1066.

It was William the Conqueror’s son Robert Curthose who built the first big castle here, a motte and bailey of traditional Norman design in 1080.  An early Roman fort Pons Aelius stood here for over two hundred years between the 2nd. and 5th. centuries, this keep is part of the remains of the castle rebuilt by Henry ll between 1168-1178, it is one of the finest surviving examples of a Norman Keep in the country. The late Norman chapel, the “King’s Chamber” and the display of archaeological finds are of particular interest, while from the tower there is a fine view over the River Tyne.

While you are here, try and visit Newcastle upon Tyne Daily Photo too, seeing as I am once again intruding into their territory.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28 mm lens, 1/125 second f8.0, iso 200

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Written by curly

April 3, 2009 at 12:01 am

Posted in Buildings, Colour, History, Newcastle

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2 Responses

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  1. It looks massive. If that is only part of the original castle, it must have been very impressive in its day.
    Would be an interesting building to visit.
    great photo!

    sherri

    April 3, 2009 at 5:45 am

  2. I don’t mind you ‘poaching’ – I found your site through Newcastle upon Tyne so now I visit both each day.

    Anyway poaching kept us during WW11 and taught us to appreciate, game and all the things the hoi polloi ate.

    Mrs K

    April 3, 2009 at 9:55 pm


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