South Shields Daily Photo

A collection of images from South Shields and the North of England

Archive for the ‘Artworks’ Category

Fire walker

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Mouth of the Tyne Festival, South Shields 2009

2009 Mouth of the Tyne Festival #1

There was a fantastic parade in South Shields on Saturday night by French street theatre group Malabar, part of this year’s Mouth of the Tyne Festival. The parade included a 9 metre high mechanised praying mantis operated by humans, and involved music, lights and pyrotechnics, as it moved along Sea Road in South Shields from the Gypsies Green Stadium to the Groyne.

I’ll be featuring more pictures this week and you can view a slide show here.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28 mm lens, 1/750 second, f5.6, iso 800

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Written by curly

July 13, 2009 at 12:01 am

Ship’s chandler

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138 High Street west, Sunderland

138 High Street West, Sunderland

Used to be a ship’s chandler in the days when they had wooden hulls and sails, now it’s a pub.

The area around the bottom end of High Street in Sunderland would have been very bustling and busy about a hundred years ago when it was the centre of a busy commercial port, now it looks a bit run down, although a fair amount of new business and apartments are growing there.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 82 mm lens, 1/750 second, f5.6, iso 200

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Written by curly

June 28, 2009 at 12:01 am

Mehndi

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Bangla Awaz, South Shields

Traditional henna tattoo

“Look at mine mum”

I bumped into this delightful family in the Ocean Road Community Centre in South Shields at a recent event hosted by “Bangla Awaz” for our small Bangladeshi community, and they were eager to show me their newly acquired mehndi (henna) tattoos. These are a traditional temporary body decoration commonly seen on the Indian sub continent and in Pakistan and Bangladesh, they are extremely popular with brides.

The girls were full of fun and very expressive, as you can see.

This picture proved quite difficult in Photoshop to deal with an obtrusive and fussy background, so a couple of layers and a mask have been utilised to convert the background first to black and white, then tinted, before applying a gaussian blur.

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 30 mm lens, 1/30 second, f4, flash

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Written by curly

June 9, 2009 at 12:01 am

Tyne Crossing #3

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Art at new tyne tunnel, jarrow

The Venerable Bede

A detailed look at the public art work decorating the hoardings and screens surrounding construction work at the new Tyne Tunnel crossing in Jarrow. Live in South Shields? Take a walk to Jarrow to see these fascinating panels near the Pedestrian Tunnel.

Beda 672-735 ad

Bede was born in 672 or 673 AD, probably in Monkton, Jarrow, Northumberland, and nothing is known of his parents. At the age of seven, he was entrusted to Abbot (St) Benedict Biscop of the monastery of St Peter in Wearmouth, near Sunderland, Durham. He’d moved with Biscop to the new monastery of St Paul in Jarrow by 685 and was ordained first as a deacon, aged 19, then as a priest aged 30. Records indicate that, apart from occasional calls on friends and visits to Lindisfarne and York, he remained there for the rest of his life.

For modern-day scholars, however, it is for his contribution to history that he is most valued. Although some of his works, such as the life of St Cuthbert, Bishop of Lindisfarne, tended to be rather uncritical and relate as fact a somewhat improbable number of miracles, his Historia Abbatum (‘Lives of the Abbots’), a book of the lives of the abbots of England, is more typical and much more of a historical reference work. As a priest and a monk, scripture was taken as the supreme authority, but in most of his works he was inclined to explore and rationalise rather than accept unquestioningly. There is no doubt that his Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum is a masterpiece by the standards of any age; it is regarded by modern scholars as the authoritative account of Christianity in England from its inception to Bede’s own time.

Bede was revered and beloved by his community, who kept vigil by his bedside during his final illness. He continued to pray and to work until the last moment; an account by one of his followers, Cuthbert, relates how he completed dictation of a translation of the Gospel of St John on the day of his death, Ascension Day, 735, after which he supposedly fell to the floor of his cell, sang the Gloria, and passed peacefully away. While this account may exhibit some poetic license, it seems likely that this prolific, profoundly religious man was exceptionally well thought of by his peers. He was buried at Jarrow, though his remains now rest in Durham Cathedral.

The title ‘Venerable’ began to be applied within a couple of generations of his death, as the influence and esteem of his writings spread. He was thus addressed by the influential Council of Aachen in 835, and this authority was cited in 1859 by Cardinal Wiseman and the English bishops when petitioning the Holy See for Bede to be created a Doctor of the Church doctor ecclesiastæ be celebrated each year on 27 May (since moved to 25 May).

His influence was and is great, and might have been greater still but for the Danish sacking of the monasteries of North Britain during the ninth Century.

Bede was, it is fair to suggest, the most learned man of his day in Britain, and quite possibly the world. Unusually, he was scrupulous in recording the sources of his information – and in asking those who copied and edited his work to preserve these references (a practice which they all too often failed to follow).

Source

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28 mm lens, 1/750 second, f6.7, iso 200

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Written by curly

June 6, 2009 at 12:01 am

Posted in Artworks, Colour, History, Jarrow

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Tyne Crossing #2

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painting of William Jobling, Jarrow

William Jobling

Day two of our look at the art work surrounding the new excavations attached to the construction of the new Tyne Tunnel, and here we have a look at the detail in the long panorama that greets us in Ferry Street, Jarrow. This section is dedicated to the death and public gibbeting of the miner William Jobling in 1832.

On June 11, 1832, Jarrow pitmen Ralph Armstrong and William Jobling were drinking in a pub in South Shields.

On the road by the toll-bar gate, near Jarrow Slake, Jobling begged from Nicholas Fairles, a 71-year-old magistrate.

Fairles refused to hand over any money, prompting Armstrong, who had followed Jobling, to attack him with a stick and a stone.

Both men then ran away, leaving Fairles seriously injured.

Two hours later, Jobling was arrested on South Shields beach. Armstrong, an ex-seaman, apparently returned to sea.

After his arrest Jobling was taken to Fairles’s home, and it was established that he had been present but had not taken part in the assault.

Jobling was returned to Durham Jail, and after Fairles died of his injuries on June 21, he was charged with murder.

Jobling was tried at Durham Assizes on Wednesday, August 1. The jury took just 15 minutes to reach a guilty verdict.

The sentence was that Jobling be hanged from a gibbet erected in Jarrow Slake, near the scene of the attack.

The judge in the case said: “I trust that the sight of that will have some effect upon those who, are to a certain extent, your companions in guilt and your companions in these illegal proceedings which have disgraced the county. May they take warning by your fate.”

Jobling was the last man to be gibbeted in the north east.

He was hanged on August 3.

After Jobling was taken from the scaffold, his clothes were removed and his body covered in pitch.

He was then riveted into a cage made of flat iron bars. His feet were placed in stirrups, from which bars of iron went up each side of his head, ending in a ring, from which the cage was suspended.

Jobling’s hands hung by his sides, and his head was covered with a white cloth obscuring his face.

In a horse-drawn wagon on Monday, August 6, his body was taken to Jarrow Slake, escorted by a troop of hussars and two companies of infantry.

The gibbet was fixed upon a stone sunk into the slake, and the heavy wooden uprights were reinforced with steel bars to prevent them being sawn through.

At high tide, the water covered up to 5ft of the gibbet, leaving a further 16ft to 17ft visible.

Isabella Jobling, the hanged man’s widow, had a cottage near the slake, so she would have been able to see her husband clearly for the three weeks he was left on display.

On August 31, after the guard on the corpse was removed, Jobling’s friends stole his body. Its whereabouts are still unknown.

Source

Camera details: Pentax K100D, 28 mm lens, 1/4000 second, f5.6, iso 200

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Written by curly

June 5, 2009 at 12:01 am

Posted in Artworks, Colour, History, Jarrow

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